R. Keith Campbell's blog

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

Happy New Year! I hope that 2013 has a greater impact on those of us with diabetes than 2012. The past ten years, we have been blessed with the development of many new medications and devices that make it a bit easier to live with diabetes. For me, 2012 was quite disappointing since several important new classes of drugs to treat diabetes that many people thought would be approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were NOT. I was especially disappointed that the FDA required more tests of an exciting product called Afrezza. It is an inhaled insulin product that is absorbed into the bloodstream very rapidly and broken down quickly. It will be a fantastic product once approved since diabetes patients can easily and conveniently inhale it as a bolus insulin. It will keep after meal blood glucose levels in check. The device is very small and easy to carry with you.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s have always been magical times of the year for me. I had a great family and my social worker mother always invited homeless people and many relatives to share the feasts associated with each holiday.

I was 8 years-old when I was diagnosed with diabetes and that was 63 years ago. For 30 of those years, self-monitoring devices for blood glucose were not available and the ability to know your blood sugars and keep them close to normal levels was a guessing game at best. I remember learning very early in my life with diabetes that there were not many foods, including desserts, that were forbidden.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

It is estimated that there are 79 million people in the United States with a condition known as PREDIABETES. People who develop type 2 diabetes seem to have a number of characteristics that predispose them to eventually being diagnosed. Pharmaceutical manufacturers that have an interest in diabetes would love to have a product they could offer to individuals with prediabetes that would prevent them from developing diabetes – it would obviously be a huge money maker for them.
Studies are being conducted to see if any of the medications that are approved for type 2 diabetes could indeed be used to postpone the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for this population.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

A friend of mine introduced me to his 3 year-old granddaughter the other day. She was quite a character and asked me if I knew my numbers. Before I could answer, she stated, "I know my numbers!” She began to count everything around us and was proud that she could add. When she finished, I told her that I also knew my numbers, but they were numbers that related to my health status. Many people do NOT like to share their numbers, especially things like age, weight, body mass index, their A1C number and if their blood sugars are high.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

It is an exciting time to be a person with diabetes (PWD). So many new drugs have been developed to treat a PWD. We are also aware that diabetes is much more than trying to keep blood glucose levels close to normal. Blood pressure and lipids need to be normalized to try to prevent cardiovascular disease. Coping skills and stress management skills need to be learned to help prevent depression. Adequate sleep and hydration need to be managed as well.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

Weight loss is a subject of much interest to many people. This is probably because 26% of the U.S. population is considered obese. This percentage translates into over 4.4 million Americans being classified as obese. A recent MSN news report described findings in a large study done at the University of Washington indicating that people were not only fat, but were in denial about the fact that they were gaining weight each year.1

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

I have attended 43 of the past 45 Scientific Sessions of the American Diabetes Association. It is the best meeting to attend to keep up to date with the latest developments in the treatment of diabetes. I especially enjoy the exhibits and seeing what new products and devices are being shown. Before 1995, there were very few exhibitors since the main products to treat diabetes were insulin and sulfonylureas and blood glucose meters. We now have over 14 classes of drugs to treat diabetes, primarily type 2 diabetes. We also have had an explosion of companies selling insulin pumps, products to treat low blood sugars, diabetes complications, and new versions of blood glucose meters that are easier to use, smaller, more accurate and do not require calibration.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

Metformin is the golden child related to treatment of type 2 diabetes. Almost daily, new articles describing the many benefits of metformin are published. Metformin is an antihyperglycemic agent which improves glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes, lowering both before and after-meal sugar levels. Its pharmacologic mechanisms of action are different from other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. Metformin decreases glucose production from the liver, decreases intestinal absorption of glucose, and improves insulin sensitivity.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

The total cost of health care in America is approximately three trillion dollars. About 12 percent of each dollar spent on health care is due to prescription drugs. This shouldn’t come as a surprise since most people think that drug costs are very high. Most of the health care costs come from hospitalization, physician’s fees, administrative activities to bill for services and other charges. Medications are considered the most efficient and effective way to manage and treat most diseases, diabetes included. Yet, almost all consumers are unhappy with having to pay for prescriptions.

by R. Keith Campbell Rph, FAADE, CDE

Last month the topic of men’s sex health and diabetes was covered. Sexual disorders in men, whether they have diabetes or not, are more obvious than sexual problems in women with diabetes. However, just like men, the subject of sexual disorders is seldom if ever confronted by health care providers (HCP).

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